Writing Center

The Writing Center is housed in the Library Learning Commons located on the second floor of the library. Contact number: 614-6726.
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HOURS:

  • Monday             8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m.
  • Tuesday            8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m.
  • Wednesday       8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m.
  • Thursday           8:00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m.
  • Friday                8:00 a.m.- 3:00 p.m.

For questions or concerns contact Writing Center Coordinator, Dr. Denise David, at Ext. 6713 or drop by her office in E254 or by E-mailing: david@niagaracc.suny.edu.

How Can I Make Best Use of the Writing Center?

You should bring a written copy of the assignment with you to the Writing Center.

If you are unclear about the requirements of the assignment, you should meet with your professor before coming to the Writing Center. Understanding the demands of a writing assignment goes a long way toward writing a successful paper.

You should plan to come to the Writing Center well before the paper is due. You may want to come more than once, working on various aspects of the paper over time. Remember, revision is key to good writing.

You should not expect that the mentors or peer tutors are going to write your paper for you. You should, however, expect that you will receive the response and encouragement that will enable you to improve the paper or writing task on which you are working.

A Whole Paper Checklist

The following questions may help you re-read your own paper if you cannot come to the Writing Center right away.

  • Have you established an unmistakable focus early in your paper?
  • Does the order in which your paper progresses make sense? Is it easy to follow? Does one point lead logically to the next?
  • Is there any content in your paper that really does not belong? Is there any information that you could eliminate?
  • As you read over the various sections of the paper, do you see clear connections to your main point?
  • Does your paper have a conclusion rather than just stopping after your last example?
  • Do you have any words that you could delete and still maintain the meaning of the sentence?
  • Have you used any clichés?
  • Have you checked spelling?
  • Have you included a title that is not underlined, not placed in quotation marks, not boldfaced and not all in capitals?

ETHICAL ISSUES IN THE WRITING CENTER

Mentors and peer tutors will never write on a student's paper. The student will make any corrections or changes him or herself.

Mentors and peer tutors will never speculate about a grade on a paper. It is inappropriate. The mentors and tutors do not know the full context of the assignment and cannot possibly speculate about a grade.

Our concern in the Writing Center is to assist students during the process of writing a paper, but we are most concerned about the overall improvement of the student's ability as a writer.

Mentors and peer tutors will maintain a professional and respectful demeanor in the Writing Center—even as they are being non-judgmental and friendly.

Mentors and peer tutors are trained to never cross ethical boundaries; the paper must be the student's own work.

The Center's Staff

Our staff is friendly, supportive, and knowledgeable. We have four writing mentors, who also serve as adjunct faculty members of the English Department, as well as a number of peer tutors, who have been trained by the Writing Center coordinator to respond to your work in useful ways.

The Center's Philosophy

Mentors and tutors serve as an audience for your writing, providing feedback on places in your writing where the meaning may be unclear, confusing, or ineffective. We will help you by asking questions that clarify information or pointing out sections in your piece where the information may be inadequate or unconvincing. If you have problems such as sentence level errors, a lack of logical connections between sentences, usage errors, or documentation problems, we will provide a more directive stance, providing correct information, and directing you to other sources for information from handbooks or other reference materials.

Resources

We have twenty-two computers available for word processing and Internet access. We have reference books with information on the correct format for MLA, APA, ASA, and Chicago Style documentation. We have dictionaries, thesauri, books on standard English usage, as well as reference books explaining the writing demands of various genre.

The Writing Center Can Help!

Writing CenterThe Writing Center is a free, drop-in center available to any NCCC student, faculty, or staff member who is currently engaged in some writing task.

It is not necessary, however, for a writer to come with a prepared draft. Writers may stop in at any stage in their writing process, ranging from trying to understand an assignment to overcoming writers' block, to organizing a paper, to editing a final draft.

The Writing Center welcomes writers of all abilities. Writers may be working on any writing task including: a writing assignment for any course; a letter of application; developing a resume; writing a short story or poem; writing a letter to the editor or a letter of complaint. Our mentors and student tutors will not do the work for you, but they will provide helpful response to your work.

Our well qualified mentors and tutors can help you with any writing assignment.  No appointment is needed, just drop in and bring the assignment or draft with you. We have computers for word processing and internet access as well as a comfortable setting in which to work. There are ample reference materials, including style sheets for various documentation formats such as MLA and APA, ASA, and CMS.

Resources for Faculty

The Writing Center was created as part of a Writing Across the Curriculum Project at Niagara County Community College to support faculty as well as students. We are a campus that takes the improvement of student writing seriously. Our faculty use writing as a way to engage students in active interaction with the content of our courses. Additionally, we ask students to write within our disciplines using the appropriate rhetorical models within various discourse communities.

The following tips may be useful to faculty in several ways. You will find tips for developing writing assignments for your classes; you will find a referral form that you may wish to have students bring with them when they come to the Writing Center; you will find the requirements needed for students you may wish to recommend as student tutors in the Writing Center.

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